What To Do When Your Bird Dies

I know this isn’t part of the saltwater tank series, but recently my parakeet Lucy died, and I thought I would write this post to help you out if you are going through the same thing. I hope this post helps you!

1. The absolute first thing you need to do is take it out of the cage. If you own other birds this will prevent disease from spreading. You make want to take your dead bird to the vet if you would like to discover the cause of death.

2. Clean the cage. If your bird died because of an illness, sterilize everything immediately. This will prevent the disease from infecting your other birds.

3. Bury the bird. This seems like the most proper way of disposing the body, so I would recommend burial. You can do whatever you prefer.

4. Allow your cage mate to grieve. If you have another bird in the cage, it is necessary to allow them time to grieve. The grieving process generally lasts a few days to a few weeks, depending on the bird.

5. Find them a new friend. Parakeets are social animals so it is best to keep them in pairs or groups. If you don’t want to go through all the trouble, remember that you need to spend at least two hours with your bird per day to keep them entertained. If you choose not to get them another bird friend, they can get very attached and friendly with you.

6. Quarantine the new bird. Have a clean, sanitized cage with new or disinfected toys and perches. (Disinfect perches by wiping them with H202 and allowing them to sun dry) The quarantine process should last at least 30 days. During this time watch your bird very closely for signs of illness, mites, or parasites. It is best to keep your bird in a different room during the quarantine, but a well-ventilated room works as well.

7. Put your birds’ cages next to each other. If they show interest in each other and are curious, let them fly around the room together. Watch them very closely for any signs of aggression, ie. raised wings, biting feet, picking other bird’s feathers or head.

8. If all has gone well so far, let them spend a day in the cage together. Don’t let them sleep together, though.

9. Redecorate or rearrange the cage both birds are staying in. This helps avoid aggression, because it seems more like neutral territory.

10. If there are no problems, allow them to spend a night in the cage together. Continue keeping a close eye on them for a week or so, but if no problems arise you should be good to go!

I hope you enjoyed this post! Please like and comment!

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